Wine and Cheese Pairing – Guide to doing it right

Note: This article originally appears on Wine & Chill. If you’re looking for a wine that needs to be delivered to your doorstep, look no further than Wine & Chill! The ordering is done seamlessly online and you’ll get your quality wine within 24 hours.

Pairing wine and cheese is an age old art – the flavours; sweet, spicy, tangy, strong, mild, milky… all need to be in tandem with the wine such that there is a flavour symphony on your tongue. And when you achieve that perfect harmony… There is nothing quite like it. With our express wine delivery, you can make your cheese and wine dream come true every other weekend (or weekday; whatever floats your boat). Good wine is simply a click away, and now you just need the cheese to match. What cheeses, you ask? Read on.

Pairing wine and cheese is an age old art – the flavours; sweet, spicy, tangy, strong, mild, milky… all need to be in tandem with the wine such that there is a flavour symphony on your tongue. And when you achieve that perfect harmony… There is nothing quite like it. With our express wine delivery, you can make your cheese and wine dream come true every other weekend (or weekday; whatever floats your boat). Good wine is simply a click away, and now you just need the cheese to match. What cheeses, you ask? Read on.

Some Tips to consider

Age vs Intensity

As a general guideline to cheeses, the older they are, the more bolder its flavour. The fat and protein content in cheese are the flavour carriers, and these two factors intensify the longer the cheese is kept growing good and mouldy. Younger cheeses tend to be milkier and slightly less pungent or strong. The same aging concept applies for wine – the longer its been kept, the stronger its flavour will be. Younger wines tend to have fresher flavours, with citrusy notes, slightly sweet with fruity, herby or even flowery notes. Older wines, in addition to these basic flavours, have more intense notes of oak, earth, toast and even minerals. We’re sure you can already see where we are going with this: Younger cheeses that tend to be more lighter in flavour go with light, younger wines. More mature wines and cheeses are better paired with each other, as well.

Sweet Goes with Salty

Sweet and salty are polar opposites in the flavour spectrum, hence it is a bit of a surprise (or no surprise at all, really) that opposites have attracted here. Sweet wines can be paired with the saltiest of cheese, such as feta or blue cheese.

The Texture Matters Too

Rich and creamy cheeses go great with oak-matured wine, or wine with a strong woodsy flavour. But if you choose not to complement the wine and cheese this way, you can contrast them, too. Camembert and Champagne, though unlikely, go great together because the bubbles in the wine help to cleanse the palate and make you want another bite.

Now let’s get down to the cheesy details

Soft/Fresh Cheese: These are cheeses that are often spreadable, mild and not aged. For this family of cheese, wines with fruity and flowery flavours work best. Typically, these cheeses are served with a side of wafers or saltwater crackers, to spread the cheese on before biting into them – they can be so soft that they don’t hold their shape.

Cheeses: Mozzarella, Ricotta, Feta, Halloumi, Camembert, Brie

Wines: Moscato, Champagne, Cava, Riesling (sweet or dry), Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc

Semi-Hard/Semi-Aged Cheese: This family of cheeses tend be a little firmer to the touch, and have a slightly stronger flavour than soft cheeses. Semi-Aged cheese is perfect to introduce yourself or friends to new cheeses that can go with wine, as they are not as popular as soft cheeses. The wines for this type of cheese need to strike a balance between acidity and fruity.

Cheeses: Edam, Emmental, Gruyere, Young Cheddar, Monterey Jack

Wines: White Burgundy, Pinot Blanc, Red Burgundy, Pinot Noir, Young Tawny Port, Chardonnay

Stinky Cheeses: These are the ones you can smell as they are being brought out of the kitchen. They will be great when you are having friends over and want to experiment. Stinky cheeses get their less-than-subtle stench due to the bacteria produced after the rind-washing process. The rind of these cheeses are washed with a salty brine or an alcoholic blend, which can develop the smell as a by-product to amazing-tasting cheese. These cheeses generally call for light bodied wines as opposed to wines that compete with its flavour.

Cheeses: Époisses, Taleggio, Morbier

Wines: Gewürztraminer, Riesling, Sauternes, red Burgundy, Pinot Noir

Hard Cheeses: These have an almost nutty yet salty taste profile. Hard cheeses have most of their moisture removed, and boast a strong and heavy texture. They are matured with the most amount of pressure. As these cheeses have a such a bold yet varied flavour profile, you can play around with the wine; either go sweet to complement the saltiness, or capture the nuttiness of the cheese with oxidative wines such as sherry.

Cheeses: Comte, Parmesan, aged Cheddar, Pecorino, aged Gouda

Wines: Aged white burgundy, Red Port, Vintage Champagne, Oloroso Sherry, Red Bordeaux

The next time you decide to have wine and cheese, you need not worry about going out to get some wine – just go online and make full use of our online wine delivery services to quench your thirst. Express wine delivery has never looked so attractive.

Note: This article originally appears on Wine & Chill. If you’re looking for a wine that needs to be delivered to your doorstep, look no further than Wine & Chill! The ordering is done seamlessly online and you’ll get your quality wine within 24 hours.

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